Experience with bilastine in the management of urticaria: Original Real-world cases of Bilastine In Treatment (ORBIT) in Asia

Article Details

Authors
Wai Kwong Cheong, Alson Wai Ming Chan, Chin Chwen Ch’ng, Wen Hung Chung, Ma Teresita Gabriel, Kiran Godse, Wat Mitthamsiri, Hao Trong Nguyen, Marysia Tiongco-Recto, Dinesh Nagrale

Article Type
Case Series

DOI
10.7573/dic.2021-12-2

Related Articles

Article Page

Abstract

Urticaria is a disabling condition, resulting in an impaired quality of life and sleep disruption, and can have an adverse impact on work-related or school-related performance and attendance. It is defined according to the presence of unknown (chronic spontaneous urticaria) or known (inducible urticaria) eliciting factors. Guidelines recommend second-generation H1-antihistamines for the first-line treatment of urticaria. Bilastine is indicated in adults, adolescents (aged ≥12 years) and children (aged ≥2 years (Mexico and some African countries), ≥4 years (Canada) or ≥6 years (Europe)) with a body weight of at least 20 kg for the symptomatic treatment of urticaria and allergic rhino-conjunctivitis. The aim of the Original Real-world cases of Bilastine In Treatment (ORBIT) study was to review real-world cases from across the Asia-Pacific region supported by evidence-based literature. Eight diverse, real-world, difficult-to-treat cases with urticaria in people aged 10–75 years are presented. Once-daily bilastine (20 mg (adults/adolescents) or 10 mg (children)) was found to be well tolerated and effective in the long-term management of chronic spontaneous urticaria and inducible urticaria.

Keywords: Asia, bilastine, case studies, chronic spontaneous urticaria, eczema/dermatitis, H1-antihistamine, inducible urticaria, real-world evidence.

Citation: Cheong WK, Chan AWM, Ch’ng CC, Chung WH, Gabriel MT, Godse K, Mitthamsiri W, Nguyen HT, Tiongco-Recto M, Nagrale D. Experience with bilastine in the management of urticaria: Original Real-world cases of Bilastine In Treatment (ORBIT) in Asia. Drugs Context. 2022;11:2021-12-2. https://doi.org/10.7573/dic.2021-12-2

Contributions: All authors contributed equally to the preparation of this manuscript. All named authors meet the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship for this article, take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole and have given their approval for this version to be published.

Disclosure and potential conflicts of interest: WKC has served as an advisory board member for A. Menarini and been a speaker for and received honoraria from Johnson & Johnson, Novartis and A. Menarini. HTN served as an advisory board member and speaker, receiving honoraria from Novartis, Janssen and A. Menarini. MTR disclosed non-financial interests for A. Menarini for acting as an advisory board member and speaker, has received support from A. Menarini for registration at conventions, and is the immediate Past President of the Philippine Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (unpaid). CCC received an honorarium from A. Menarini. MTG received honoraria from A. Menarini for lectures and has acted in an unpaid role on an advisory board for A. Menarini. KG has received honoraria from A. Menarini and received support from A. Menarini for the present manuscript. WM received support from A. Menarini for writing the present manuscript, has received honoraria from A. Menarini for lectures and panel discussion, and from GlaxoSmithKline, Organon and AstraZeneca for lectures, and has received registration support from GlaxoSmithKline and Organon for attending virtual academic meetings. AWMC and WHC had no conflicts of interest to disclose. DN is an employee of A. Menarini. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) Potential Conflicts of Interests form for the authors is available for download at: https://www.drugsincontext.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/dic.2021-12-2-COI.pdf

Acknowledgements: The authors thank A. Menarini for providing financial support for the Asia-Pacific STAR-D Specialist Taskforce on Allergy/Dermatology initiative and medical writing support provided by David P Figgitt, PhD, ISMPP CMPP™ and Steve Clissold, PhD, ISMPP CMPP™, Content Ed Net (Singapore).

Funding declaration: Funding was received from A. Menarini, including financial support for the Asia-Pacific STAR-D Specialist Taskforce on Allergy/Dermatology initiative and medical writing support.

Copyright: Copyright © 2022 Cheong WK, Chan AWM, Ch’ng CC, Chung WH, Gabriel MT, Godse K, Mitthamsiri W, Nguyen HT, Tiongco-Recto M, Nagrale D. Published by Drugs in Context under Creative Commons License Deed CC BY NC ND 4.0, which allows anyone to copy, distribute and transmit the article provided it is properly attributed in the manner specified below. No commercial use without permission.

Correct attribution: Copyright © 2022 Cheong WK, Chan AWM, Ch’ng CC, Chung WH, Gabriel MT, Godse K, Mitthamsiri W, Nguyen HT, Tiongco-Recto M, Nagrale D. https://doi.org/10.7573/dic.2021-12-2. Published by Drugs in Context under Creative Commons License Deed CC BY NC ND 4.0.

Article URL: https://www.drugsincontext.com/experience-with-bilastine-in-the-management-of-urticaria-original-real-world-cases-of-bilastine-in-treatment-orbit-in-asia

Correspondence: Wai Kwong Cheong, Specialist Skin Clinic & Associates Pte Ltd, Singapore. Email: cheong.wkwong@gmail.com

Provenance: Submitted; externally peer reviewed.

Submitted: 23 December 2021; Accepted: 19 January 2022; Publication date: 15 March 2022.

Drugs in Context is published by BioExcel Publishing Ltd. Registered office: Plaza Building, Lee High Road, London, England, SE13 5PT.

BioExcel Publishing Limited is registered in England Number 10038393. VAT GB 252 7720 07.

For all manuscript and submissions enquiries, contact the Editorial office editorial@drugsincontext.com

For all permissions, rights and reprints, contact David Hughes david.hughes@bioexcelpublishing.com

Download free full text PDF